I love patina on each piece of jewelry that I make, and I would like to patina remains unchanged. I don't know how to protect my peaces. Now I use varnish, but I would like to know if there is a better solution.Thank you

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I use renaissance wax - it's inexpensive and works like a charm, without changing the look of the piece. You only have to use a tiny bit, so it lasts a long time:

http://www.amazon.com/Rockler-65mL-can-Renaissance-Polish/dp/B001DS...
wow, I was looking for the same answer, thanks for asking the question. Also wondered if people were concerned about selling patina'd pieces, being that for some, the color is the big attraction, and if it wears off, I would think the customer would feel cheated somehow.
I would agree that some people will be disappointed when the finish changes, I know I would if I wasn't familiar with copper. We need to tell the customer what to expect. Maybe make up a couple of table cards that describes the "Beauty of Copper" and how it changes depending upon the wearer and other environmental conditions? Also tell the user how to clean and care for their copper jewelry and how to store it so it's beauty lasts. I have only offered copper pieces for sale at my last show and I made sure that everyone who bought them knew that they were copper and that the color would change. I plan on making up some information cards before my next show to put in the package with the sale.
Tina

Kelly Horton said:
wow, I was looking for the same answer, thanks for asking the question. Also wondered if people were concerned about selling patina'd pieces, being that for some, the color is the big attraction, and if it wears off, I would think the customer would feel cheated somehow.
thats a great idea! I did order the wax that was suggested!

Tina Julich said:
I would agree that some people will be disappointed when the finish changes, I know I would if I wasn't familiar with copper. We need to tell the customer what to expect. Maybe make up a couple of table cards that describes the "Beauty of Copper" and how it changes depending upon the wearer and other environmental conditions? Also tell the user how to clean and care for their copper jewelry and how to store it so it's beauty lasts. I have only offered copper pieces for sale at my last show and I made sure that everyone who bought them knew that they were copper and that the color would change. I plan on making up some information cards before my next show to put in the package with the sale.
Tina

Kelly Horton said:
wow, I was looking for the same answer, thanks for asking the question. Also wondered if people were concerned about selling patina'd pieces, being that for some, the color is the big attraction, and if it wears off, I would think the customer would feel cheated somehow.
I do not believe that the renaissance wax can be found here, but I'll try to find. I found the recipe on the internet:
"What you need:
• 1 part beeswax
• 1 part naphtha (lighter fluid)
• Airtight storage jar
• Cotton swabs
• Soft cloth

Use small beads of beeswax and naphtha, mixing in equal amounts. I obtain naphtha from a drugstore or cigar shop. Mix to the consistency of cake icing. The naphtha odor will not remain on the jewelry. Apply a thin layer with a cotton swab, let dry, then buff lightly with a clean cotton swab or soft cloth. If you apply too much wax, you’ll need to be aggressive in removing it. This can also cause some of the patina to come off. Apply it in a thin layer, and you should have no problem preserving the finish. If the finishing mixture thickens, add more naphtha to thin it. And obviously, don’t use this method near a flame."

Does anyone have experience with this mix.Beeswax and naphtha
This recipe sounds like it would be very similar to the renaissance wax - the wax has the same type of smell, but doesn't remain on the jewelry either..:)

Aleksandra Jovanovic - KSANDRA said:
I do not believe that the renaissance wax can be found here, but I'll try to find. I found the recipe on the internet:
"What you need:
• 1 part beeswax
• 1 part naphtha (lighter fluid)
• Airtight storage jar
• Cotton swabs
• Soft cloth

Use small beads of beeswax and naphtha, mixing in equal amounts. I obtain naphtha from a drugstore or cigar shop. Mix to the consistency of cake icing. The naphtha odor will not remain on the jewelry. Apply a thin layer with a cotton swab, let dry, then buff lightly with a clean cotton swab or soft cloth. If you apply too much wax, you’ll need to be aggressive in removing it. This can also cause some of the patina to come off. Apply it in a thin layer, and you should have no problem preserving the finish. If the finishing mixture thickens, add more naphtha to thin it. And obviously, don’t use this method near a flame."

Does anyone have experience with this mix.Beeswax and naphtha
actually, I found the wax on the amazon link, and I did purchase it :)

Karen Guthrie said:
This recipe sounds like it would be very similar to the renaissance wax - the wax has the same type of smell, but doesn't remain on the jewelry either..:)

Aleksandra Jovanovic - KSANDRA said:
I do not believe that the renaissance wax can be found here, but I'll try to find. I found the recipe on the internet:
"What you need:
• 1 part beeswax
• 1 part naphtha (lighter fluid)
• Airtight storage jar
• Cotton swabs
• Soft cloth

Use small beads of beeswax and naphtha, mixing in equal amounts. I obtain naphtha from a drugstore or cigar shop. Mix to the consistency of cake icing. The naphtha odor will not remain on the jewelry. Apply a thin layer with a cotton swab, let dry, then buff lightly with a clean cotton swab or soft cloth. If you apply too much wax, you’ll need to be aggressive in removing it. This can also cause some of the patina to come off. Apply it in a thin layer, and you should have no problem preserving the finish. If the finishing mixture thickens, add more naphtha to thin it. And obviously, don’t use this method near a flame."

Does anyone have experience with this mix.Beeswax and naphtha
you can buy renaissance wax at contenti.com also:

http://www.contenti.com/products/polishing/520-080.html
Thank you for your information and experience that you share with me.
Renaissance wax is a very good product, highly respected. But give me a rattle can of automotive quality clear coat. Some are better than others. Experiment a little.

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